Healthcare Information Security

HIPAA and Compliance News

What Happens in HIPAA Audits: Breaking Down HIPAA Rules

By Elizabeth Snell

- HIPAA audits are something that covered entities of all sizes must be prepared to potentially go through. As technology continues to evolve, facilities need to ensure that they are maintaining PHI security and understand how best to keep sensitive information secure.

HIPAA audits are important for all covered entities

The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) had originally scheduled its second round of HIPAA audits for the fall of 2014, yet as of this publication, round two is still waiting to be scheduled. Regardless, HIPAA audits are an essential aspect to the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules.

We’ll break down the finer points of the audit process and why it is important, while also highlighting tips for facilities in case they are selected for an OCR HIPAA audit.

What are the HIPAA audits?

The OCR HIPAA audit program was designed to analyze the processes, controls, and policies that selected covered entities have in place in relation to the HITECH Act audit mandate, according to the HHS website.

READ MORE: Lawyers Break Down 2016 HIPAA Audits, Connected Devices

OCR established a comprehensive audit protocol that contains the requirements to be assessed through these performance audits. The entire audit protocol is organized around modules, representing separate elements of privacy, security, and breach notification. The combination of these multiple requirements may vary based on the type of covered entity selected for review.

The HIPAA audits also are designed to cover HIPAA Privacy Rule requirements in seven areas:

  • Notice of privacy practices for PHI
  • Rights to request privacy protection for PHI
  • Access of individuals to PHI
  • Administrative requirements
  • Uses and disclosures of PHI
  • Amendment of PHI
  • Accounting of disclosures.

Why are the HIPAA audits important?

HIPAA audits are not just a way for OCR to ensure that covered entities are keeping themselves HIPAA compliant. Having periodic reviews of audit logs can help healthcare facilities not only detect unauthorized access to patient information, but also provide forensic evidence during security investigations. Auditing also helps organizations track PHI disclosures, learn about new threats and intrusion attempts, and even help to determine the organization’s overall effectiveness of policies and user education.

In FY 2014 alone, the OCR resolved more than 15,000 complaints of alleged HIPAA violations, according to the national FY 2016 budget request proposal report.

READ MORE: Are You Prepared for the OCR HIPAA Audits?

“OCR conducted a pilot program to ensure that its audit functions could be performed in the most efficient and effective way, and in FY 2015 will continue designing, testing, and implementing its audit function to measure compliance with privacy, security, and breach notification requirements,” the report authors explained. “Audits are a proactive approach to evaluating and ensuring HIPAA privacy and security compliance.”

The HIPAA audits are important because they help incentivize covered entities to remain HIPAA compliant, but they are also an opportunity to strengthen up organization’s security measures and find any weak spots in their approach to security.

What if I am selected for the HIPAA audit program?

As previously mentioned, there is not yet an exact date for when the next round of HIPAA audits will take place, there have been several reports that preliminary surveys have been sent to covered entities that may be selected for audits.

According to a report in The National Law Review, OCR will audit approximately 150 of the 350 selected covered entities and 50 of the selected business associates for compliance with the Security Standards. Furthermore, OCR will audit 100 covered entities for compliance with the Privacy Standards and 100 covered entities for Breach Notification Standards compliance.

READ MORE: Top 5 Things to Remember About OCR HIPAA Audits

Whether your organization received one of those surveys or not, it’s important for entities to have at least a basic plan in place for potential audits. Healthcare organizations should not rely on a false sense of security, and they need to ensure that when their data systems and safeguards are being reviewed, that facilities try and keep in mind what the OCR would be looking for so no areas are missed.

Current physical safeguards, administrative safeguards, and technical safeguards are not only required by the Security Rule, but they work together to protect health information. In addition to those areas, here are a few key things for covered entities to maintain, as they may play a role in the HIPAA audit process:

  • Perform comprehensive and periodic risk analyses
  • Keep thorough inventories of business associates and their contracts or BAAs.
  • Maintain thorough accounts of where ePHI is stored, this includes but is not necessarily limited to internal databases, mobile devices and paper documents.
  • Thorough records of all security training that has taken place.
  • Documented evidence of the facility’s encryption capabilities.

If covered entities have performed a proper risk assessment, preparing for the HIPAA audits will not be as daunting. For further discussion on the legal implications of risk assessments and analyses, click here.

Maintain compliance and stay prepared

Perhaps one of the best ways to prepare for a potential OCR HIPAA audit is to keep all three safeguards current, ensuring to adjust them as necessary as technology evolves.

It is also essential for covered entities to know their BAs, and have all appropriate contracts and business associate agreements in place and up to date.

Conducting periodic risk analysis will also be beneficial, and covered entities should be sure to be able to provide evidence of compliance. This can include documentation of policies and procedures being in place. For example, instances where a facility has sanctioned people and whether it was consistent with its sanctions policy will be beneficial if an audit takes place that looks at the sanction process.

Without a risk analysis, it is much more difficult for healthcare organizations to know where they are in terms of security. This can be detrimental not only for HIPAA audits, but also in maintaining comprehensive data security. Periodic reviews will help facilities continue to work toward maintaining HIPAA compliance and keeping sensitive data as secure as possible.

X

SIGN UP and gain free access to articles, white papers, webcasts and exclusive interviews on

HIPAA Compliance
BYOD
Cybersecurity
Data Breaches
Ransomware

Our privacy policy

no, thanks